3D printers print ten houses in 24 hours

 

 

 http://oa.chinabyte.com/printer/326/12918826.shtml

 

 

 

 

 

3D printers print

ten houses in 24 hours

 

 

By Zhou Zhou and Sun Qing

 

A private company in east China recently used a giant printer set to print out ten full-sized houses within just one day.

The stand-alone one-story houses in the Shanghai Hi-Tech Industrial Park look just like ordinary buildings. They were created using an intelligent printing array in east China’s city of Suzhou.

The array consists of four printers that are 10 meters wide and 6.6 meters high and use multi-directional automated sprays. The sprays emit a combination of cement and construction waste that is used to print building walls layer-by-layer.

Ma Yihe, the inventor of the printers, said he and his team are especially proud of their core technology of quick-drying cement.

This technology allows for the printed material to dry rapidly. Ma has been cautious not to reveal the secrets of this technology.

Ma, who has been designing 3D printers for 12 years, said the new technology is cost-effective and environmentally friendly.

“To obtain natural stone, we have to employ miners, dig up blocks of stone and saw them into pieces. This badly damages the environment,” Ma said.

“But with the 3D printing, we recycle mine tailings into usable materials. And we can print building with any digital design our customers bring us. It’s fast and cheap,” he said.

Buildings made with 3D printing technology can spare construction workers from having to work in hazardous, dusty environments, he said.

The printers can print multi-story houses, but Chinese building codes do not currently include standards for 3D-printed houses.

Quality checks are currently conducted by examining each piece of the structure as it is printed out.

Ma said he hopes his printers can be used to build skyscrapers in the future.

 

 

 

 

 

Video : Chinese firm on 3D-printing experiment

 

 

 

 

3D printing is the latest thing in manufacturing technology. It’s being used to make toys, spare parts — it even has medical uses. But in China, one company is trying something even bolder. They can use 3D printing to build 10 houses in 24 hours. CNC paid them an exclusive visit.

A Chinese company named Yingchuang New Materials has advanced the science of 3D printing by printing 10 houses entirely out of recycled materials, in just under a day.

Ma Yihe, CEO of the company reveals the significance of their technology.

MA YIHE (CEO of Yingchuang New Materials): “We haven’t heard of any company in the world that could actually print a real house. The other day, president Obama went to visit a company, where they could only print plastics and fill the plastic model with cement. But we can print a real house, a house that people could actually live in.”

An enormous 3D printer, measuring 32-meters long, 10-meters wide, and 6.6-meters high, was used to print each of the structural components of the houses.

The houses, each covering an area of 200 sqm, are printed with special “ink” – construction waste, tailings and industrial waste that was recycled.

The best thing is, they are built with very little labor and they are incredibly inexpensive — approximately 48-hundred U.S. dollars each.

MA YIHE (CEO of Yingchuang New Materials): “This is made by our most developed 3D printing technology. It is continuous 3D printing. We now have 4 continuous 3D printing machines and they are now working on one assembly line to print out this kind of stone. The output of this stone is ten thousand cubic meters per day. After they are printed in blocks, we can cut them in whichever size we need.”

Meanwhile, this printing technology also protects workers from mine tailings.

MA YIHE (CEO of Yingchuang New Materials): “To obtain natural stones, we need mining, digging up blocks of stones and saw them into pieces. The whole mining process and manufacturing process is damaging our environment badly. Now with 3D printing, we are not polluting the environment. Instead, we are recycling mine tailings and by using a special treatment, we turn them into stones like this. Besides, we could provide customized stone, of any thickness in any color in big sizes. It’s fast and cheap.”

Ma has been doing research for 12 years to achieve his printing architecture dream.

He not only designed the printer, but also developed a specially made printing liquid, charging system and jet that is suitable for printing large structures.

After many difficulties, he did it.

According to Ma, it can change the way we build houses, as well as save more money.

MA YIHE (CEO of Yingchuang New Materials): “With 3D printing, in the future, we could build good buildings with good material and without waste. All that demolished building waste, industrial waste or even mine tailings can return to the buildings with our recycling treatment. This will ensure a healthier working environment for our rural migrant workers, as well as reducing building costs, especially the energy use, from 70 percent to 30 percent, as we’ve estimated.”

Ma also says his technology still needs to be improved. And the company hopes one day the technology could provide affordable housing for the poor.

However, experts say there are still many problems with 3D printed houses, like the importance of outside form, internal structure, comprehensive strength, stiffness, and fire resistance.

3D printing does change traditional building techniques, but the stiffness, the strength and the durability still require further tests.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

New Post  | Updated  on August 22, 2014

 

 

Video:  3D-printed houses put into use in Shanghai

 

 

 

 

 

Earlier this year, a private company in east China used a giant printer set to print out ten full-sized houses within just one day. LIFESTYLES takes you to Shanghai, to see how people work in the 3D-printed houses.

The stand-alone one-story houses in the Shanghai Hi-Tech Industrial Park look just like ordinary buildings. They were created using an intelligent printing array in east China’s city of Suzhou.

The array consists of four printers measuring 32-meters long, 10-meters wide, and 6.6-meters high.The houses, each covering an area of 200 square meters, are printed with special “ink” – construction waste, tailings and industrial waste that was recycled.

The best thing is, they are built with very little labor and they are incredibly inexpensive — approximately 4,800 U.S. dollars each. Now, the 3D-printed houses have been used as temporary offices for a resettlement project.

ZHU (Staff): “We’ve been working in these 3D-printed houses since April this year. There are 12 staffs in total.”

According the staffs, there is no difference between working in a 3D-printed house and an ordinary office. In fact, they say, it is more comfortable to work in these houses in hot summer day.

ZHU (Staff): “When we are staying in the 3D-printed houses, we feel it is cool inside, as the wall keeps the heat outside. The temperature inside stays at 27 degrees Celsius. We rarely use the air conditioners.”

Ma Yihe has been designing 3D printers for 12 years.He says he and his team are especially proud of their core technology of quick-drying cement, which allows for the printed material to dry rapidly.

MA YIHE (3D printers innovator): “This technology is cost-effective and environmentally friendly, as it recycles mine tailings into usable materials, and could print building with digital designs. Moreover, the buildings made with 3D printing technology can spare construction workers from having to work in hazardous and dusty environments.”

Ma hopes his printers can be used to build skyscrapers in the future. He also wishes one day the technology could provide affordable housing for the poor.

However, experts say there are still many problems with 3D printed houses, like the importance of outside form, internal structure, comprehensive strength, stiffness, and fire resistance.

And, Chinese building codes do not include standards for 3D-printed houses currently.

3D printing does change traditional building techniques, but the stiffness, the strength and the durability still require further tests.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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