Malaysian PM says missing jetliner crashes in Indian Ocean as search intensified

 

 

 

• • • • • •  • • • • • •  • • • • • •

LONDON    2014-03-25   05:34:34

>>  Remarkable detective work provides final clue to whereabouts of missing flight

By Peter Barker

A remarkable piece of high-tech data detective work has provided what looks to be the missing clue to the tragic fate of missing Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370, an expert said on Monday of March 24.

Malaysian Prime Minister Najib Razak earlier on Monday said that information provided by British satellite company Inmarsat and the British government’s Air Accidents Investigation Branch (AAIB) confirmed that MH370 had flown to a remote part of the Indian Ocean where the flight ended.

David Stupples, professor of electrical and electronic engineering at City University in London, told Xinhua Monday evening, “I think Inmarsat has moved incredibly quickly. If you put this out to a research organisation they would probably have taken three to six months to come up with some research like that. Inmarsat has achieved this in a few days.”

Inmarsat had come up with a theory to apply to the data it had collected from MH370 during the flight, and had then tested the results on aircraft in flight.

Stupples explained that the satellite systems on board the aircraft were not switched off, so would have been registering with the Inmarsat satellite.

Stupples said the aircraft was “electronically silent”, apart from this registration with the Inmarsat satellite, which was working on its uplink.

“This registration occurs once every hour, and the transponder on the aircraft will say ‘I’m still here’, and the satellite will come back and say ‘Gotcha’,” said Stupples.

Stupples said the satellite was in a geo-stationary orbit, at 37,000 km above the equator and a signal from the aircraft to the satellite would take about 0.12 of a second; this would take longer to arrive the further north or south the plane was of a center point on a cone of possible positions.

Stupples explained, “Because of this they knew it was on a corridor that was either going north or south. Now they knew it was not going north because none of the radars in Thailand or Burma or above there had registered an unidentified aircraft in their airspace.”

He added, “So they said it went south; what Inmarsat has done is take the signals received from the aircraft and looked at the frequency change. If you stand on an race track with a race car coming towards you, you notice there is a sound difference as it comes towards you and then it drops away.”

Stupples said this was the Doppler Effect, and the principle could be applied to satellite signals.

“So, what they did here was to analyse the signals received from the aircraft, then calculate that the aircraft was moving south at a certain velocity,” he said.

Stupples said Inmarsat knew MH370 had made seven pings, one every hour, and that it had been travelling for seven hours and that is approximately the fuel that the aircraft had on it.

Stupples continued, “They tested this on a number of aircraft flying around to make certain that this principle worked.”

“I think it can be used in the future. We are all very sad at the tragic loss, so we hope this kind of technology will never be used again because hopefully we won’t end up with another missing aircraft as we have here,” he added.

 

 

 

 

• • • • • •  • • • • • •  • • • • • •

WASHINGTON   2014-03-25   04:04:52

 

U.S. State Department spokeswoman Marie Harf addresses a regular news briefing

in Washington D.C. March 24, 2014. Marie Harf said on Monday that the U.S. had

no “independent corroboration” about the announced crash of the missing Malaysia

Airlines MH370 flight in the southern Indian Ocean.   Photo by Bao Dandan

 

 

 

>>  U.S. says no “independent corroboration” about flight MH370 crash

By Yi Aijun

The United States said Monday that it has no “independent corroboration” about the announced crash of the missing Malaysian jetliner in the southern Indian Ocean.

“I don’t have any independent corroboration of that,” State Department spokeswoman Marie Harf told reporters at a regular news briefing, hours after Malaysian Prime Minister Najib Razak announced the jet’s crash at a press conference citing new analysis of satellite data.

“I have no reason to believe it’s not true. I just don’t have any update for you,” Harf said, adding Washington was working ” very closely” with the Malaysian government.

Najib said the missing Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370′s last position was in the middle of the Indian Ocean, west of Perth, Australia.

The Boeing 777-200 aircraft, en route from Kuala Lumpur, capital of Malaysia, to Beijing, with 227 passengers and 12 crew members aboard, mysteriously disappeared from radar shortly after takeoff in the early hours of March 8.

 

 

 

 

 

 

• • • • • •  • • • • • •  • • • • • •

BEIJING   2014-03-25   03:08:53

>>  China demands Malaysia to provide satellite data about flight MH370

China has demanded Malaysia to provide satellite data which led to its judgement that flight MH370 ended in the Indian Ocean, Chinese Deputy Foreign Minister Xie Hangsheng said here on Monday night.

“We demand the Malaysian side to make clear the specific basis on which they come to this judgement,” Xie said during an urgent meeting with Malaysian Ambassador Datuk Iskandar Bin Sarudin in Beijing.

He demanded the Malaysian side to provide all information and evidence related to the analysis of satellite data.

Xie urged Malaysia to continue all the relevant work including search and rescue for the missing plane, which carried 239 people.

Xie emphasized that the search and rescue work must not stop at the moment.

Chinese maritime authorities said late Monday night China will send more vessels to the waters of the southern Indian Ocean to search and salvage wreckage of Malaysia Airline MH370. China has already sent some six vessels to the area where two Chinese IL-76 aircraft are scouring the rough seas for the missing plane that carried 154 Chinese passengers.

Malaysian Prime Minister Najib Razak said on Monday that new analysis of satellite data suggested that the missing plane “ended” in the southern Indian Ocean.

The plane went missing about one hour after takeoff from Kuala Lumpur en route to Beijing on March 8.

During the meeting with Sarudin, Xie said China pays great attention to Malaysia’s announcement that the missing plane ended in the Indian Ocean.

“We have noticed that the Malaysian side said it will make further elaboration on related details,” Xie said.

 

 

 

 

 

 

• • • • • •  • • • • • •  • • • • • •

PARIS   2014-03-25  02:54:01

>>  French agency says need more limited search area to find missing Malaysian jet

By Huang Han

A more limited search area is needed to be defined to launch undersea searches to localize the missing Malaysia Airlines flight MH370, France’s Bureau of Investigation and Analysis (BEA) said Monday.

The French agency made the announcement in a statement after new analysis of satellite data suggested the airplane ended in the southern Indian Ocean.

With surface sea searches currently carried out to identify debris observed in the southern Indian Ocean, the agency, whose technical assistance had been requested by the Malaysian authorities in the search for the Boeing passenger jet, noted that such a vast area doesn’t make it feasible to conduct undersea searches.

“An undersea phase to localize the aeroplane from flight MH370 could only be launched if the operations under way today enable a more limited search area to be defined than the current search areas,” it said.

The agency also said that three of its staff members, who had been sent on March 16 to Kuala Lumpur to participate in the search for the missing jet, had returned this weekend.

Earlier on Monday, Malaysian Prime Minister Najib Razak announced that the missing Malaysia Airlines flight MH370 “ended” in the southern Indian Ocean, according to new satellite data provided by the British company Inmarsat.

 

 

 

 

 

 

BEIJING   2014-03-25   01:20:48

>>  China to send more vessels to search, salvage MH370 wreckage

China will send more vessels to the waters of the southern Indian Ocean to search and salvage wreckage of Malaysia Airline MH370, Chinese maritime authorities said late Monday night.

China Maritime Search and Rescue Center said it is working on solutions overnight, promising to beef up search efforts after Malaysian Prime Minister Najib Razak announced the missing plane ended in the southern Indian Ocean.

 

 

 

 

 

 

SINGAPORE   2014-03-25   00:46:04

>>  Singapore PM “deeply saddened” by news of MH370′s crash

Singapore Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong said on Monday that he is “deeply saddened” by the news that the missing Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370 had “ended in the southern Indian Ocean.”

“For more than two weeks, we have been hoping against hope that somehow the worst did not happen. We know how anguished and desperate the families and friends of those on board felt,” he wrote in a Facebook post.

“While we are still far from understanding what happened, I hope this latest news will nonetheless give some certainty and closure,” he said.

“My deepest sympathies and condolences to the families and friends of those on board, and to the governments of Malaysia and China,” he added.

 

 

 

 

 

 

• • • • • •  • • • • • •  • • • • • •

BEIJING   2014-03-25   00:36:44 

 

Relatives of passengers on the missing Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370 watch press

conference TV live at Lido Hotel in Beijing on March 24, 2014. New analysis of statellite

data suggested that the missing Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370 “ended” in the southern

Indian Ocean, said Malaysian Prime Minister Najib Razak on Monday.   Photos by Chen Yehua 

 

Relatives of passengers on the missing Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370 console each other

at Lido Hotel in Beijing, capital of China, March 24, 2014.   Photo by Chen Yehua 

 

A relative of passengers on the missing Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370 faints when

watching the press conference TV live at Lido Hotel in Beijing on March 24, 2014.

Photo by Chen Yehua

 

A relative of passengers on the missing Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370 crys at Lido Hotel

in Beijing on March 24, 2014.   Photo by Chen Yehua 

 

One of the relatives of the passengers on the missing Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370 gets

first aid after watching the press conference TV live at Lido Hotel in Beijing on March 24, 2014.

Photo by Luo Xiaoguang 

 

Relatives of passengers on the missing Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370 react at Lido Hotel

in Beijing on March 24, 2014.   Photo by Shen Bohan

 

 

 

 

>>  Grief grips relatives after announcement on missing plane

By Cao Kai, Wang Ruoyao, Yang Yichen and Shi Shouhe

Men and women wailed in Beijing’s Metro Park Lido Hotel after Malaysian Prime Minister Najib Razak announced on Monday night the missing plane ended in the southern Indian Ocean.

Deep sorrow and anger gripped about 200 relatives of passengers of the missing Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370 after they watched a live broadcast of the prime minister’s press briefing at 10 p.m. at a hotel conference room.

Some collapsed and were taken out of the room on stretchers. Some even have clashes with swarming photographers struggling to take photos.

“Why they always keep us uninformed?” cried an elderly woman, falling on her knees.

Reporters are banned from entering the room where the relatives are staying.

Sixteen days after the jet disappeared with 239 people on board, of whom 154 were Chinese, the Malaysian prime minister announced the plane’s last position was a remote location far from any possible landing sites, adding that it ended in the southern Indian Ocean according to new satellite data.

While some still have hopes.

“The announcement is not a final result,” said a young woman, a close friend of a 25-year-old passenger on board the plane.

“I’m waiting for the truth to be disclosed,” she said.

“I dreamed of her twice and I must wait for her to come back,” she added.

 

 

 

 

 

 

• • • • • •  • • • • • •  • • • • • •

 

KUALA LUMPUR & PERTH   2014-03-25   00:13:44

 

Malaysian Prime Minister Najib Razak (2nd from left) speaks during a press conference

in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, on March 24, 2014. New analysis of statellite data suggested

that the missing Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370 “ended” in the southerni Indian Ocean,

said Malaysian Prime Minister Najib Razak on Monday.   Photo by Chong Voon Chung

 

 

 

 

 

Malaysian PM says

missing jetliner 

crashes in Indian Ocean

as search intensified

 

 

By Wang Bowen

 

 

Malaysian Prime Minister Najib Razak speaks during a press

conference in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, on March 24, 2014.

Photo by Wang Shen

 

 

New analysis of satellite data suggested that missing Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370 had crashed in the southern Indian Ocean, Malaysian Prime Minister Najib Razak said on Monday of March 24.

Najib released the sad news at a hastily-convened press conference in Kuala Lumpur, capital of Malaysia.

The prime minister said the UK Air Accidents Investigation Branch and Inmarsat, the UK company that provided the satellite data, have concluded that “the missing jetliner flew along the southern corridor,” and its last position was in the middle of the Indian Ocean, west of Perth, Australia.

He also said the type of analysis used to investigate the mystery of the jetliner has never been used before.

“This is a remote location, far from any possible landing sites,” said Najib, adding that more details will be announced at a press briefing Tuesday morning.

The families of those aboard were also called into a meeting to hear the news.

In a text message sent to the families before Najib announced the news, Malaysia Airlines said “MH370 has been lost and none of those on board survived.”

Screaming and crying were coming from a room in a Beijing hotel where families of the passengers onboard gathered and a significant number of stretchers were rushed to them.

Search for the missing jet continued on Monday in the vast Indian Ocean.

Both Chinese and Australian planes spotted some suspicious objects in the southern Indian Ocean in search for the missing plane, but whether the objects were related to the missing jet had not been confirmed.

The crew aboard a Chinese IL-76 plane saw two relatively big floating objects with many small white ones scattered within a radius of several kilometers.

The searchers then relayed the information to the Australian Maritime Safety Authority (AMSA), asking the Australian side to send other planes to the area of interest for further examination while making their way back to the air base.

However, a U.S. P-8 aircraft was unable to locate the suspicious objects that the Chinese planes have spotted, AMSA said in a tweet.

Later on Monday, an Australian aircraft spotted two objects in the ocean, different from those found by a Chinese plane earlier, and they can be retrieved within hours or around early Tuesday at the latest.

“The crew on board the P-3 Orion reported seeing two objects, the first a grey or green circular object and the second an orange rectangular object,” Prime Minister Tony Abbott told the parliament on Monday.

Abbott said Australia did not know whether any of these objects in the southern Indian Ocean were from the missing Malaysia Airlines flight MH370. “They could be flotsam,” he said.

A total of 10 aircraft joined Monday’s search for MH370 whose whereabouts has remained unknown since it vanished on March 8 on its way from Kuala Lumpur to Beijing, carrying 239 people.

The search has zeroed in on two areas of 59,000 square km to 68,500 square km respectively.

Meanwhile, the U.S. Pacific Command has ordered the Pacific Fleet to move a black box locator into the region, according to a U.S. Navy statement released on Sunday.

In the statement, the U.S. Navy stressed that the deployment of the locator, namely the Towed Pinger Locator 25 (TPL-25), was only a “precautionary measure in case a debris field is located.”

The French Foreign Ministry also said on Sunday that France will mobilize further satellite means to help find the missing MH370 after its satellite images showed “floating debris” in the southern Indian Ocean.

The announcement reduced some mystery shrouded around the missing plane but the exact location of the plane requires further search.

 

 

 

Malaysian Prime Minister Najib Razak speaks during a press conference in Kuala Lumpur,

Malaysia, March 24, 2014.   Photo by Chong Voon Chung

 

Malaysian Prime Minister Najib Razak leaves the press conference in Kuala Lumpur,

Malaysia, on March 24, 2014.   Photos by Chong Voon Chung

 

 

 

 

 

 

Share


5,159 Comments

  1. Wow, incredible blog layout! How long have you been running a blog for?
    you make blogging look easy. The entire glance of your web site is magnificent, let alone the content material!

  2. Quality articles or reviews is the important to interest the visitors to pay a quick visit
    the website, that’s what this web site is providing.

  3. Hi there, I discovered your blog by way of Google whilst searching for a comparable
    topic, your site got here up, it appears great. I’ve bookmarked it in my google
    bookmarks.
    Hello there, simply changed into alert to your weblog thru Google, and located
    that it is really informative. I am gonna be careful for brussels.
    I’ll be grateful if you happen to continue this in future.
    Lots of other people might be benefited out of your writing.
    Cheers!

  4. Hogan Shoes wrote:

    Spot on with this write-up, I truly believe
    this website needs far more attention. I’ll probably be back again to read through more, thanks for the
    info!

  5. whoah this weblog is excellent i like studying your articles.
    Keep up the good work! You understand, lots of
    persons are hunting round for this info, you can help them greatly.

    My weblog – Buzzing: SmartBuzzer from 4iTECH is a new buzzing device for brass
    musicians – http://www.facebook.com -

  6. I like the helpful information you supply in your articles.

    I will bookmark your weblog and test again here regularly.
    I am moderately certain I’ll be told lots of new stuff proper here!
    Good luck for the next!

  7. Hurrah! In the end I got a blog from where I be able
    to really take valuable data concerning my study and
    knowledge.

  8. Nice response in return of this question with solid arguments and telling everything concerning that.

  9. As the admin of this site is working, no hesitation very
    shortly it will be well-known, due to its feature contents.

  10. Right here is the perfect website for anyone who would like to understand this topic.

    You understand a whole lot its almost hard to argue with you (not that I really will
    need to…HaHa). You definitely put a fresh spin on a
    subject that’s been discussed for a long time. Great stuff,
    just wonderful!

  11. cabincrew.my wrote:

    If some one needs to be updated with most recent technologies therefore he must be pay a visit this website and be
    up to date all the time.

  12. What’s up, after reading this amazing piece of writing i
    am too cheerful to share my knowledge here with friends.

  13. If you would like to grow your knowledge just keep visiting this
    web site and be updated with the most recent gossip posted here.

  14. Hello my family member! I want to say that this article is awesome, great written and come with almost all vital infos.
    I’d like to see extra posts like this .

  15. It is perfect time to make some plans for the future and it is
    time to be happy. I’ve read this post and if I could I wish
    to suggest you few interesting things or
    suggestions. Maybe you could write next articles referring to this article.
    I desire to read even more things about it!

  16. I have read so many articles or reviews about the blogger lovers except this post
    is actually a fastidious post, keep it up.

  17. This article will assist the internet people for building up new
    website or even a blog from start to end.

  18. Hurrah, that’s what I was searching for, what a information! existing here at this web site, thanks admin of this web page.

  19. Hi! Do you know if they make any plugins to protect against hackers?
    I’m kinda paranoid about losing everything I’ve worked hard on. Any recommendations?

Leave a Reply

*