Kunming terrorist attack suspects captured

 

People attend a candlelight vigil to mourn for victims killed by knife-wielding attackers

at Kunming Railway Station in Kunming of southwest China’s Yunnan Province, on March 3,

2014. Chinese police said Monday in a statement that three suspects involved in the terrorist

attack had been captured, and the terrorist gang of eight members led by Abdurehim Kurban

was responsible for the attack. Police shot and killed four of them and captured an injured

female at the scene on Saturday night, the statement said.   Photo by Lin Yiguang

 

People attend an gathering to mourn for victims killed by knife-wielding attackers

at Kunming Railway Station in Kunming of southwest China’s Yunnan Province,

on March 3, 2014.    Photo by Lin Yiguang

 

People attend an gathering to mourn for victims killed by knife-wielding attackers

at Kunming Railway Station in Kunming of southwest China’s Yunnan Province,

on March 3, 2014.    Photo by Lin Yiguang

 

People attend a candlelight vigil to mourn for victims killed by knife-wielding attackers

at Kunming Railway Station in Kunming of southwest China’s Yunnan Province, on March 3,

2014.    Photo by Lin Yiguang

 

Candles form the date “March 1″ at a gathering held to mourn for victims killed

by knife-wielding attackers at Kunming Railway Station in Kunming of southwest

China’s Yunnan Province, on March 3, 2014.   Photo by Lin Yiguang

 

Candlelights are seen at a gathering held to mourn for victims killed by knife-wielding

attackers at Kunming Railway Station in Kunming of southwest China’s Yunnan

Province, on March 3, 2014.    Photo by Lin Yiguang

 

People attend a candlelight vigil to mourn for victims killed by knife-wielding attackers

at Kunming Railway Station in Kunming of southwest China’s Yunnan Province,

on March 3, 2014.   Photo by Lin Yiguang

 

 

 

 

Kunming terrorist

attack suspects captured

 

 

By Wang Di and Fu Shuangqi

 

 

Chinese police said on Monday of March 3 that three suspects involved in the terrorist attack in the southwestern city of Kunming had been captured.

The Ministry of Public Security said in a statement that the terrorist gang led by Abdurehim Kurban was responsible for the attack.

Police shot and killed four of them and captured an injured female attacker at the scene on Saturday night, the statement said.

The knife-wielding attackers slashed frantically at crowds at a railway station in Kunming in southwest China’s Yunnan Province on Saturday, killing 29 people and injuring 143.

The health authority said 20 of the 143 injured in Kunming are still in critical condition.

Soon after the terrorist attack, Chinese President Xi Jinping ordered law enforcement agencies to strike out with full forces and bring those accountable to justice as soon as possible.

Xi urged the greatest efforts to treat the injured and help those who have lost their loved ones.

Chinese Premier Li Keqiang ordered police forces nationwide to beef up security, particulary at public places of big crowds.

Senior Chinese security official Meng Jianzhu arrived in Kunming at 5:30 a.m. Sunday to oversee the situation.

Order was restored in Kunming on Sunday, with train arrivals resumed after three trains with 3,000 passengers were affected on Saturday night. About 60,000 passengers left the station on Sunday, higher than the 59,000 on Saturday. All local middle and primary schools opened as normal on Monday, with enhanced security.

Chinese leaders and political advisors Monday paid silent tribute to the victims of the terrorist attack at the opening of the annual session of the National Committee of the Chinese People’s Political Consultative Conference (CPPCC).

Du Qinglin, vice chairman of the CPPCC National Committee, condemned the terrorists behind the attack and conveyed condolences to the victims.

“The violent terrorist attack in Kunming on March 1 has caused great losses to people’s lives and property,” said Du.

The carnage has shocked and outraged the international community. United Nations Secretary General Ban Ki-moon condemned the terror attack.

“Terrorist attacks cannot be justified under any circumstances and under any reasons,” stressed Ban. “This was unacceptable. The perpetrators must be brought to justice.”

Ban conveyed his “most sincere condolences and sympathies to those families of the victims” and wished those injured a speedy recovery.

“The international community has suffered too much, [and] too long by these terrorist attacks here and there. We must be united to fight against terrorism,” Ban said.

Germany strongly condemned the mass stabbing at the train station soon after the bloody attack.

“We condemn the brutal attack on innocent civilians at a train station in Kunming in southwest China in the strongest terms,” a German foreign ministry spokesman said in a statement. “This act cannot be justified.”

Other countries, including France, Russia, the United States, Britain, Australia, and Afghanistan, all expressed condemnation of the brutal violence that caused heavy casualties.

 

 

 

 

 

 

“East Turkistan”

forces flags found

at Chinese station

after terrorist attack

 

 

By Wang Huihui

 

 

Police have found flags of “East Turkistan” forces at a Chinese train station where a terrorist attack killed at least 29 civilians and injured over 140 in the southwestern city of Kunming, a spokesman said on Monday.

“Some flags of the ‘East Turkistan’ forces were discovered at the site, according to the initial findings of the police. Investigation of the terrorist attack is still under way,” Foreign Ministry spokesman Qin Gang said at a daily news briefing.

The “East Turkistan” forces, among which the East Turkistan Islamic Movement (ETIM) is a major group, are one of the major and direct reasons for increasing terrorist attacks in China, particularly in Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region.

The ETIM, listed by the United Nations Security Council as a terrorist group, claimed responsibility for the Tian’anmen attack in October in which five people were killed and 40 others injured.

Qin stressed that the Chinese government will stage a tough crackdown on the worst violent terrorists, whoever and wherever they are, whatever affiliation they may have, and whenever the attacks happen.

The terrorists, positioning themselves in opposition to any ethnic groups or religions, are a common enemy to mankind, Qin said.

When asked to comment on some foreign governments that failed to call the Saturday violence a terrorist attack, Qin expressed his hope that the international community could be unanimous in voice and action when dealing with terrorists.

Foreign governments and international organizations have expressed condemnation and indignation over the terrorist attack and sent their sympathies to the Chinese government and people, the families of the victims and the injured in particular, Qin said.

“This represents the mainstream of the international community, the voice and conscience of mankind,” Qin added.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Photo taken on March 2, 2014 shows the Kunming Railway Station in Kunming, capital of

southwest China’s Yunnan Province.   Photo by Zhu Guigen

 

Passengers walk on the square of the Kunming Railway Station in Kunming, capital of

southwest China’s Yunnan Province, on March 2, 2014.   Photo by Zhu Guigen 

 

Passengers line up to buy tickets at the Kunming Railway Station in Kunming, capital of

southwest China’s Yunnan Province, on March 2, 2014. The order at the railway station

has been restored to normal after an overnight terrorist attack which left 29 people dead

and 130 others injured.   Photo by Zhu Guigen 

 

 

 

 

Kunming restores order

after deadly terror attack

 

 

By Lü Dong, Li Baojie, Yi Ling, Pang Mingguang, Wang Jiang,

Li Huaiyan, Wang Changshan, He Chunhao and Hou Wenkun

 

 

Order has been restored in Kunming, capital of southwest China’s Yunnan Province, where a deadly terrorist attack on Saturday night left 29 dead and more than 130 injured.

At the train station where the attacked happened, train arrivals resumed on Sunday after three trains with 3,000 passengers were affected on Saturday night, said station officials.

Meanwhile, 60,000 passengers are expected to leave the station on Sunday, higher than the 59,000 on Saturday.

Part of a major road in front of the railway station is still under traffic control and a waiting area on a square east of the station is cordoned off.

With a heavy police presence, normal operations have resumed and passengers can walk into and out of the station with no new restrictions.

Security screening of passengers and luggage is being carried out and staff are maintaining order in more crowded areas.

In a ticket hall, people were seen queuing to buy train tickets. Some chatted with each other while others were playing cards.

Security has been beefed up at the city’s Changshui International Airport, with increased security personnel and tougher scrutiny of passengers and luggage.

The municipal government said on Sunday that evidence at the crime scene showed that the Kunming Railway Station terrorist attack was orchestrated by Xinjiang separatist forces. No details have been given.

The foreign affairs office of the Yunnan provincial government said there were no reports that foreigners were killed or injured in the attack as of 2:30 p.m. Sunday. Neither are Hong Kong, Taiwan and Macao compatriots among the victims,

Chinese President Xi Jinping has ordered law enforcement agencies to strike out with full forces and bring those accountable to justice as as soon as possible.

Xi urged the greatest efforts to treat the injured and help those who have lost their loved ones.

Chinese Premier Li Keqiang has ordered police forces nationwide to beef up security, particulary at public places of big crowds.

Senior Chinese security official Meng Jianzhu arrived in Kunming at 5:30 a.m. to oversee the situation.

Separately, the city’s education authorities said all local middle and primary schools will open as normal on Monday but with enhanced security.

School officials will be on duty before and after class and police officers will be patrolling school campuses and surrounding areas.

Kunming’s citizens have been eager to help. More than 2,000 Kunming citizens have donated 560,000 milliliters of blood as of Sunday, the city’s blood center said.

As of 9:00 p.m., people were still lining up at a blood donation shuttle parked around commercial district in downtown.

A total of 27 medical experts have been dispatched to Kunming to help the treatment of victims, the National Health and Family Planning Commission said Sunday.

The experts were recruited from 12 hospitals in Beijing, Shanghai, Chengdu, Guangzhou and other cities.

 

 

 

 

 

 

China journalist association

slams Western media

on Kunming attack coverage

 

 

By Wang Di

 

 

The All-China Journalists Association on Monday condemned Western media for their “double standards” reporting on a deadly knife attack in southwest China’s Kunming.

“Some Western media, who always shout for anti-terrorism and human rights, have turned a blind eye to the terrorist attack in Kunming,” said the association in a statement.

Certain media assumed an ambiguous attitude to the knife-wielding terrorists, calling them “attackers” or “activists” instead of terrorists, it said.

Some even defended the brutal stabbing spree that has caused heavy civilian casualties, the association noted in the statement.

“Obviously, it’s double standards,” it said. “They have violated the principle of being objective and lack professional ethics in journalism.”

The ruthless killing of innocent people by violent and terrorist elements fully exposed their anti-human, anti-civilization and anti-society nature, and the group of rioters are indisputably terrorists, the association said.

“We call on journalists around the globe to obey the code of press ethics, discard political bias, work together to condemn terrorist violence of any form, and uphold righteousness by refusing to spread fake information to defend terrorism,” it said.

The knife-wielding terrorists slashed frantically at crowds at a railway station in Kunming in southwest China’s Yunnan Province on Saturday, killing 29 people and injuring 143.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Kunming attack

shows China’s

anti-terrorism

challenges

 

 

By Li Huaiyan, Yi Ling, Mao Yong and Li Baojie

 

 

Chinese authorities now face new challenges in countering terrorism as terrorist attacks have crossed the Xinjiang border years after 2009, when the worst riots in decades broke out in the region.

Tian’anmen, an iconic spot in the heart of Beijing, was a target in October and, months later, the Kunming railway station in the southwestern province of Yunnan became the prey.

The United Nations and many countries, including Russia, France, the United States, Japan and Germany, have denounced the brutal attack on civilians.

 

WHY KUNMING?

 

On Saturday night, a group of knife-wielding attackers slashed frantically at crowds at the Kunming railway station, killing 29 people and injuring 143.

Police shot dead four of them and captured an injured female attacker at the scene. Police said Monday that the remaining three suspects involved in the attack had been captured.

Authorities said evidence at the crime scene showed that the terrorist attack was orchestrated by Xinjiang separatist forces.

The separatist forces have also been blamed for a series of violent attacks mainly on police stations and government offices in Xinjiang in past years.

Why did they target Kunming? The question haunted many locals as well as people in other parts of the country when they learned about the shocking news.

Kunming, capital of Yunnan, is a major tourist destination known for its mild climate and perennial sunshine. Yunnan is home to more than 25 ethnic minorities whose population totals 15.5 million, accounting for one-third of the province’s total.

Yunnan, which borders the notorious Golden Triangle, has become a major place for Xinjiang separatist forces to hide or sneak into neighboring countries and to join in jihad in the Middle East, according to police from Yunnan and Xinjiang.

In the face of tightening security in Xinjiang, the terrorists have chosen to strike outside of Xinjiang, police said.

Ahead of the two sessions of the national legislature and political consultative conference, Urumqi, capital of Xinjiang, and the national capital of Beijing have beefed up security measures, making Kunming and other cities seemingly much easier targets, said Li Wei, director of the security and arms-control research institute at the China Institute of Contemporary International Relations.

 

 

NEW CHALLENGES

 

The attacks in Beijing and Kunming have sent a clear signal that the terrorists are shifting to target civilians, and this underlines the need to set up a national security commission to meet new counterterrorism challenges, said experts.

The two attacks indicate an escalation and spillover of the violent terrorist activities in Xinjiang and they aimed to generate greater horror in the public, said Yang Shu, head of the Central Asia Institute of Lanzhou University.

Wang Dahao, a writer from Xinjiang who has written several review articles of his hometown, said that while separatists conducted terrorist activities in Xinjiang, they also were starting to generate an atmosphere of terror outside Xinjiang.

“In their eyes, terrorist attacks on civilians outside Xinjiang could have bigger influence worldwide and trigger bigger panic nationwide. This is what they want,” Wang said.

Li said the Kunming violence sounded a warning that similar attacks could happen in other regions.

“Judging from the timing and how they conducted the killing spree, the terrorists made careful preparations and planning,” said Li. “The attack came ahead of the two sessions and it indicated that they had clear political motives.”

Zhao Gancheng, a counterterrorism expert with the Shanghai Institute for International Studies, said this kind of terrorist attack has seldom happened in China, except in Xinjiang.

The violence occurred at a big transport terminal in a bustling city, and this has put to test the Chinese government’s response to major emergencies, Zhao said.

Zhao said China has set up a national security commission, and the latest terrorist attack means the commission has to act quickly.

To fight terrorism, the government should step up pre-warnings and precautions, but boosting the public’s awareness in taking preventive measures is a long-term task, said Li.

Many warned that making sufficient precautions when terrorists target civilians is a daunting task.

“We have set up a national security commission, but what will the local governments do? How to integrate their security departments? How will we respond if similar attacks occur in other regions? These are some of the questions we need to think about,” said Nian Da, a veteran in Kunming.

Meanwhile, the penetration of laptop computers, mobile phones and the Internet have made it easier to spread religious extremism and instigate violent crimes, according to police authorities in Xinjiang.

Xinjiang has been at the country’s forefront against terrorism. Violent attacks have erupted periodically across the vast region over the past two decades. Experts say many are linked to a surge in religious extremism in the region.

On July 5, 2009, rock-flinging and knife-wielding thugs looted shops, torched vehicles and killed nearly 200 people in Urumqi. The government blamed overseas groups for inciting the riots.

Violent terrorist attacks have been increasing since 2009 and have become the biggest security threat to Xinjiang.

Some 190 terrorist attacks were recorded in Xinjiang in 2012, increasing by a significant margin from 2011, according to the regional public security department.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Empathy, love 

soothe pains

after Kunming

terrorist attack

 

 

By Wang Ruoyao, Li Huaiyan, Li Meng, Pang Mingguang, Zhou Hongpeng and Hou Wenkun

 

 

After a stabbing rampage cast a shadow over China’s Kunming City, residents and people throughout the country have lamented the loss of lives while delivering support to those haunted by the horror.

Twenty-nine innocent people were killed and 143 others injured at Kunming Railway Station following a terrorist attack perpetrated by a group of black-clad separatists from Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region on Saturday night.

On Monday afternoon, Chinese leaders and political advisors paid silent tribute to the victims at the opening ceremony of the annual session of the National Committee of the Chinese People’s Political Consultative Conference in Beijing.

Around 4 p.m. at Baohua Temple in Kunming, capital city of southwest China’s Yunnan Province, scores of monks chanted prayers for the deceased.

“In addition to Buddhism, all religions respect lives. Therefore, the terrorist attack was not a religious issue, because it went against principals of good championed by all religions,” said the temple’s abbot, Master Chong Hua.

At the train station square, the site of the attack, citizens have voluntarily gathered to mourn the victims with wreaths, flowers and candles over the past two days.

During her lunch break on Monday, resident Tu Fan placed a large bouquet of yellow chrysanthemums under a massive bull sculpture at the square.

“Not only for myself, my colleagues from Xinjiang also wanted me to do this for them,” said 26-year-old Tu.

Locals must not panic and should have faith in the triumph of good over evil, Tu said. “Fear is what the terrorists expect from us.”

Two native retirees, surnamed Guan and Wang respectively, made a long bus trip to the square, but failed to find a florist. Finally, they collected roadside wild flowers to show their respect and sympathy to the dead.

The two men in their 60s said they did not come earlier for fear that they might impede the rescue work.

A large-scale memorial ceremony was held at the same venue on Sunday night as hundreds of residents and tourists spontaneously assembled to grieve the deceased.

Among the mourners was 27-year-old Wu Bo, who migrated to Kunming from his hometown in Sichuan Province for work last week. He took dozens of red candles to the square, calling on passersby to join the ritual.

“I arrived at Kunming only days ago, but it gave me a very good first impression. I don’t want the city’s beauty to be destroyed this way,” said Wu, who helped police transport 21 wounded people to the hospital on Saturday night.

“It’s sad to realize lives are so fragile. I just want to tell everyone ‘be strong,’” said Kunming resident Yang Hu, struggling to hold back tears.

Despite lingering grief, citizens have been eager to lend a hand to the injured survivors and those busy handling the aftermath.

Since Sunday, some restaurants have started to offer free meals to police officers on guard to ensure safety and order at the railway station as well as medical workers at the scene.

“They must be exhausted after working overnight. It’s our duty to help them fill up, given that many snack bars nearby have suspended business after the killing spree,” said Huang Jinlei, a manager with the Fuzhaolou restaurant, located about 600 meters from the station.

Huang added that their services would continue until the police fulfill their security tasks.

Policeman Li Mingyang described a heartwarming scene on his account on Weibo, China’s equivalent to Twitter.

“Tired from the all-night patrol, I went to a breakfast stand crowded with people… When they saw me, they made way for me and asked me to buy first. They said ‘you cops worked so hard!’ At that moment, I felt my nose twitching…” Li wrote on Sunday morning.

The posting had been forwarded more than 90,000 times as of Monday night.

In the wake of the bloodshed, more than 2,000 locals donated 560,000 milliliters of blood on Sunday, resolving a blood shortage crisis as a result of the violence.

“I hope to bring a little bit of warmth to the ‘Spring City’ with my act. I love Kunming,” said Hu Ting, a sophomore at Yunnan Normal University, waiting in a long queue at a blood donation station downtown.

In addition to physical treatment, psychological consultants are ready to help survivors relieve the trauma caused by the harrowing experience.

“Some of the injured we visited said the murderers’ image popped into their minds when they closed their eyes. That suggests they have suffered huge mental damage,” said Wang Haijing, vice president of the Red Cross Society of China (RCSC).

It is the first time the RCSC has carried out mental health interventions after such an incident, said Wang. “But we can borrow experience from the practices of our U.S. counterpart after the 9/11 tragedy.”

The organization’s Yunnan branch will launch a hotline on Tuesday dedicated to psychological assistance for those affected by Saturday’s deadly attack.

While expressing moral support to violence-stricken Kunming, netizens across the country have vigorously called for rationality and warned against blind hatred.

“It’s stupid and dangerous to impose hatred upon an ethnic group as a whole … Please treat our Uygur compatriots who abide by the law kindly,” read a widely circulated posting on WeChat, a popular instant messaging service.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

“We are not like them,”

say Uygurs in Kunming

 

 

By Zhou Yan, Yi Ling, Li Meng and Li Huaiyan

 

 

Dashuying Village in Jinma township is an out-of-the-way community about 8 kilometers east of Kunming’s city center.

It is home to about 3,600 permanent residents, mostly retirees from an old state-run factory nearby.

Its vitality mainly comes from over 20,000 migrants from other parts of China, including 135 Uygurs from northwest China’s Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region — the largest single group of Uygur dwellers in Kunming.

“We are not like them,” said Abliz, a 62-year-old Uygur who has run a store with his son and daughter-in-law for 11 years.

He was referring to the terrorists from Xinjiang who, black-clad and wielding long knives, killed 29 civilians and injured 143 at Kunming railway station Saturday night.

“Everyone in the neighborhood knows it’s safe to buy food here. They know we are honest, law-abiding people — they have eyes and brains,” he said in Mandarin Chinese with a strong Uygur accent.

The store, covering about 10 square meters, serves Xinjiang-style fast food, such as noodles, fried mutton, pancakes and buns, at two small tables. It also sells raisins, nuts, tea and dairy products from Xinjiang.

At lunchtime, his longtime customers — mostly Uygurs, but a few Han people as well — dropped in for a quick meal.

“Business is more or less the same as before,” said Abliz.

Many relatives called from his hometown in Xinjiang’s Ili to see how he was getting along.

“They said if the locals were hostile to the Uygurs, I might as well go back home,” he said.

But Abliz said he would stay.

“Some people are watchful, but nobody is hostile,” he said. “We’ve lived here long enough to feel like part of the community. We’re certainly not ready to move, because my grandson still goes to school in Kunming.”

 

 

HAN AND UYGURS

 

Abliz’s store is one of many Xinjiang-style stores and restaurants in the community.

The community, close to Kunming’s second ring road, has easy access to traffic, but living conditions are not comparable to the cozy, modern communities in downtown Kunming.

Most of the native residents live in small apartments their former employers sold them for comparatively low prices. These are gray brick structures built in the 1980s of five or six stories tall.

Others have had private properties built in the neighborhood and have leased extra rooms to migrants.

As a result of this property expansion, the narrow streets in town are fully packed with buildings on both sides: some are less than 2 meters apart and one can smell what the neighbors are cooking without leaving the house.

Most of the town dwellers are employed locally, so life is convenient.

Dashuying community has two grocery markets, a school, a hospital, dozens of restaurants and countless roadside stores selling anything from food and drinks to lottery tickets and underwear.

A poster outside a barber shop says that a haircut costs 10 yuan. For 150 yuan, customers can get a tattoo.

Zhu Zhengqun, a woman from Yunnan’s Zhaotong City, runs a tailor’s shop and helps attend to her aunt’s property: a 6-storey building with 12 rooms ranging from 7 to 18 square meters each.

All the rooms are leased to migrants for 300 to 420 yuan a month each. The tenants share one bathroom.

“We never rent rooms to Uygurs,” said Zhu, 36. “In fact, the Uygurs all live close to one another on the other side of the street. Sometimes they hire a whole building.”

Zhu and her husband, a man from Sichuan Province, have lived in the community for 10 years. Their children, a boy and a girl, were born and brought up here.

Zhu described the Han residents and Uygurs as two “isolated” groups. “Each minds his own business. You can’t say they are on good terms: there’s no conflict, but very little in common, too.”

But she believes “there are kind people everywhere, of all ethnic groups.”

“You can’t say all the Uygurs are bad only because some of them have become terrorists,” she said.

Zhu’s neighbor, a junk collector surnamed Wang, sometimes collects waste from the Uygur people in town.

“I’d say they are nice people, friendly and straightforward. When I offer a price, they always say ‘deal’ and seldom bargain,” said Wang.

After Saturday’s knife attacks, however, Wang stopped visiting the Uygur families for junk. The community was seized with tension: many police cars could be seen, and policemen patrolled its streets in pairs.

The killings also brought a flood of reporters to the obscure town, including foreign reporters.

Despite their calm posture and easygoing manner, the townspeople have been reluctant to face the press.

A young Uygur man who was making buns outside a fast food restaurant refused to say a word and turned around to escape the lens of a Hong Kong reporter.

“I talk to you because we are all Chinese,” Abliz told Xinhua. “I don’t talk to foreigners.”

“We don’t speak their language and don’t want them to misinterpret us,” explained his son, Abliz Lahim.

Most of the town dwellers Xinhua interviewed Monday said they hoped Kunming would soon recover from the aftermath of the killings.

“Life still goes on, and I hope this lovely little town will continue to be my home,” said Abliz.

“It’s a good place for doing business,” said Zhang Dawei, a barbecue restaurant owner and Han national, adding that the village has “a good location, enough spending power and adequate supplies.”

Liu Huihong, a community committee official, was optimistic the place would remain “peaceful and in good order.”

“I’ve been working at the community for 10 years,” he said. “The residents — Han, Uygur and a few Muslim Hui people — never had any disputes. Even thefts were rarely reported.”

Liu said he was indignant at and grieved by Saturday’s killings.

“I hope the injured will recover soon and the terrorists will be brought to justice,” he said. “There are good Uygurs and bad Uygurs. The same is true with any other ethnic groups. But our community is always open to law-abiding citizens of all groups.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

Twenty Kunming

attack victims still

in critical condition

 

 

By Liu Tong and Wang Di

 

 

The National Health and Family Planning Commission said Monday that 20 of the 143 patients injured in the Kunming railway station terrorist attack are still in critical condition.

The commission said 104 emergency operations have been performed and they have dispatched another five doctors to help treat the victims.

The five are skilled experts in dentofacial surgery, hand surgery, chest surgery and urinary tract surgery, putting the total number of specialists dispatched to Kunming at 29.

Several knife-wielding assailants stabbed and slashed passengers with long-bladed knives at the square in front of the Kunming Railway Station and the ticket hall at 9:20 p.m. Saturday, killing 29 people and injuring more than 140 others.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Red Cross opens

therapy hotline

after SW China attack

 

 

By Wang Yan and Lü Dong

 

 

The Yunnan Branch of the Red Cross Society of China will open a hotline on Tuesday to provide therapy services to people who sustained psychological trauma from Saturday’s terror attack.

The Red Cross’s branch in southwest China’s Yunnan Province will mobilize specialists from its psychological assistance volunteer group to offer mental care services through the hotline, the branch said on Monday.

A group of veiled men and women swarmed on the square of the Kunming railway station in the provincial capital on Saturday, killing 29 civilians and injuring more than 140 others.

 

 

 

 

 

China orders regular

school evacuation drills

 

 

By Guo Likun and Wu Jing

 

 

China’s Ministry of Education on Monday asked schools and kindergartens to organize evacuation drills on a regular basis to ensure quick response to emergencies such as earthquakes and fires.

Schools are advised to carry out at least one drill each month while kindergartens should do so every three months, according to a guideline issued by the ministry.

“People generally have only two minutes to escape during earthquakes and fires,” the guideline says.

It asks middle schools to finish each drill within two minutes and primary schools within three minutes.

Urban schools with comparatively more students and rural boarding schools should carry out more evacuation drills, the guideline adds.

Schools with school buses are also advised to carry out regular drills to prepare students for security-related emergencies.

 

 

 

 

 

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