Chinese Premier wants more U.S. high-tech imports

 

Chinese Premier Li Keqiang (right) shakes hands with U.S. Secretary of Commerce Penny

Pritzker who came to attend the 24th Sino-U.S. Joint Commission on Commerce and Trade

in Beijing on December 19, 2013.   Photo by Xie Huanchi

 

Chinese Premier Li Keqiang (right) shakes hands with United States Trade Representative

Michael Froman who came to attend the 24th Sino-U.S. Joint Commission on Commerce

and Trade in Beijing on December 19, 2013.   Photo by Xie Huanchi

 

Chinese Premier Li Keqiang (right) shakes hands with United States Trade Representative

Michael Froman who came to attend the 24th Sino-U.S. Joint Commission on Commerce

and Trade in Beijing on December 19, 2013.   Photo by Xie Huanchi

 

Chinese Premier Li Keqiang meets with U.S. Secretary of Commerce Penny Pritzker,

United States Trade Representative Michael Froman and U.S. Agriculture Secretary Tom

Vilsack who came to attend the 24th Sino-U.S. Joint Commission on Commerce and Trade

in Beijing on December 19, 2013.   Photo by Xie Huanchi

 

 

 

 

Chinese Premier

wants more U.S.

high-tech imports

 

 

By Xiong Zhengyan

 

Chinese Premier Li Keqiang on Thursday of December 19 urged the United States to relax limits on China’s high-tech imports.

“We expect the U.S. to relax restrictions on high-tech exports to China and provide a good environment for Chinese businesses to invest in the United States,” Li said in a meeting with the U.S. delegation.

The delegation includes U.S. Secretary of Commerce Penny Pritzker, Trade Representative Michael Froman and Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack, who came to Beijing for the 24th Joint Commission on Commerce and Trade (JCCT), which begins on Friday of December 20.

Calling economic cooperation the ballast of China-U.S.relations, Li called on the two countries to make best of their advantages and improve cooperation.

“I expect both sides to take a pragmatic attitude and understand each other to seek good results from the JCCT and deepen bilateral trade cooperation,” Li said.

Li said common ground outweighs differences in China-U.S. relations as and applauded growing collaboration.

“Both sides should tap potential for further cooperation, respect each other’s core interests and major concerns, properly handle differences and seek sound and steady growth of bilateral relations,” Li said.

Pritzker, on behalf the U.S.delegation, said having strong economic relations is of “vital importance” to both countries.

“Having a positive and successful JCCT will help strengthen bilateral relationship,” she said.

She underscored the U.S. commitment to stronger cooperation with China in trade, investment, telecommunications, agriculture, food security and intellectual property protection.

She also pledged to deal with frictions properly.

The JCCT is an annual forum launched in 1983 for the two countries to promote trade and address issues of mutual concern.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Officials attend the 24th China-US Joint Commission on Commerce and Trade (JCCT)

in Beijing on December 20, 2013. The 24th China-US Joint Commission on Commerce

and Trade was held here from December 19 to December 20.   Photo by Xie Huanchi

 

 

 

 

China, U.S. start

annual trade talks

 

By Xiong Zhengyan and Bai Jie

 

Annual trade talks between China and the United States started on Friday of Decemnber 20 in an effort to address trade frictions and build a foundation for the new model of major-power relations between the world’s two biggest economies.

“This is the first Joint Commission on Commerce and Trade (JCCT) since the new Chinese and U.S. administrations took office,” Chinese Vice Premier Wang Yang said at the meeting.

The U.S. delegation includes U.S. Secretary of Commerce Penny Pritzker, Trade Representative Michael Froman and Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack.

This year marks the 30th anniversary of the JCCT, an annual forum launched in 1983 for the two countries to address trade and investment issues.

“The JCCT has witnessed soaring bilateral trade, which has totaled 500 billion U.S. dollars this year from 4 billion U.S. dollars in 1983,” Wang said.

Bilateral investment has increased to 100 billion U.S. dollars this year from 100 million U.S. dollars in 1983, Wang said.

He said the JCCT also helps build a solid foundation for the new model of major-power relations, which presidents of the two countries reached consensus on during their summit in June in California.

Wang stressed the important role played by the JCCT in the past three decades, saying that “without the JCCT, any breakthrough or any resolution to the differences in bilateral trade would be impossible.”

Wang said he expects the ongoing JCCT to be a friendly and mutually beneficial meeting.

“We have the potential here today to demonstrate our two countries’ ability to remove trade and investment barriers, increase openness and efficiency of our markets, and ensure the stable trade and investment relationship moves forward,” Froman said at the opening session.

“Government and business leaders in the U.S. and around the world have expressed how the JCCT should play an important role in supporting shared growth and prosperity between the world’s two largest economies,” Pritzker said.

“As a former business leader, I believe strongly through close cooperation we can and should achieve mutually beneficial outcomes and tangible results,” Pritzker said.

Pritzker said the U.S.-China relationship is “entering in a moment of opportunity” and that the two nations should “seize this moment by taking both short term and long-term steps that show we are pursuing a balanced and ever growing trade and investment relationship.”

She suggested the two sides move forward in areas such as intellectual property rights, services liberalization, government procurement, agricultural and other market access and regulatory issues.

“It is important that we make progress. It is critical to the prosperity to the people of both China and the United States. We as leaders have the responsibility,” she said.

 

 

 

 

Chinese Vice Premier Wang Yang (center), U.S. Secretary of Commerce Penny Pritzker

(left) and United States Trade Representative Michael Froman attend the 24th China-US

Joint Commission on Commerce and Trade (JCCT) in Beijing on December 20, 2013.

Photo by Xie Huanchi 

 

Chinese Vice Premier Wang Yang, U.S. Secretary of Commerce Penny Pritzker and United States

Trade Representative Michael Froman attend the signing ceremony for cooperation agreement

during the 24th China-US Joint Commission on Commerce and Trade (JCCT) in Beijing

on December 20, 2013.   Photo by Xie Huanchi

 

 

 

 

China, U.S. conclude

annual trade talks

 

By Xiong Zhengyan, Bai Jie and Hou Lijun

 

China and the United States on Friday of December 20 concluded their annual trade talks, agreeing to remove some trade barriers and build a foundation for the new model of major power relations.

“This is the first Joint Commission on Commerce and Trade (JCCT) since the new Chinese and U.S. administrations took office,” Chinese Vice Premier Wang Yang said at the start of the meeting.

The U.S. delegation includes U.S. Secretary of Commerce Penny Pritzker, Trade Representative Michael Froman and Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack.

This year marks the 30th anniversary of the JCCT, an annual forum launched in 1983 to address trade and investment issues.

“The JCCT has witnessed soaring bilateral trade, which has totaled 500 billion U.S. dollars this year from 4 billion U.S. dollars in 1983,” Wang said.

Bilateral investment has increased to 100 billion U.S. dollars this year from 100 million U.S. dollars in 1983, Wang said.

Wang said the decision on reform approved by the third Plenary Session of the 18th Communist Party of China (CPC) Central Committee in November will offer strong impetus to bilateral trade.

“We support statements from Chinese officials that indicate that China will move towards a system in which the market plays a decisive role,” Pritzker said, calling for the reform decision to translate into tangible results at an early date.

Wang stressed the important role played by the JCCT in the past three decades, saying that “without the JCCT, any breakthrough or any resolution to the differences in bilateral trade would be impossible.”

Wang called on the JCCT to help expand collaboration opportunities and build a solid foundation for the new model of major-power relations, which presidents of the two countries reached consensus on during their summit in June in California.

“We have the potential here today to demonstrate our two countries’ ability to remove trade and investment barriers, increase openness and efficiency of our markets, and ensure the stable trade and investment relationship moves forward,” Froman said at the opening session.

“Government and business leaders in the U.S. and around the world have expressed how the JCCT should play an important role in supporting shared growth and prosperity between the world’s two largest economies,” Pritzker said.

“As a former business leader, I believe strongly through close cooperation we can and should achieve mutually beneficial outcomes and tangible results,” Pritzker said.

Pritzker said the U.S.-China relationship is “entering in a moment of opportunity” and that the two nations should “seize this moment by taking both short term and long-term steps that show we are pursuing a balanced and ever growing trade and investment relationship.”

She suggested the two sides move forward in areas such as intellectual property rights, services liberalization, government procurement, agricultural and other market access and regulatory issues.

“It is important that we make progress. It is critical to the prosperity to the people of both China and the United States. We as leaders have the responsibility,” she said.

The in depth discussions covered 40 topics in trade and investment and reached fruitful results, said the statement released by the Foreign Ministry after the talks.

Both sides agreed to sign a new memorandum of understanding (MOU) on cooperation in agriculture as soon as possible, said Chinese Vice Agriculture Minister Niu Dun at a press briefing.

They agreed on promoting China’s cooked poultry exports to the United States and U.S. beef exports to China, said Niu.

They also reached agreement on business confidentiality, software, services, general manufacturing and electronic business, the statement said.

The U.S. Trade and Development Agency (USTDA) will provide 10 billion U.S. dollars to support China-U.S. cooperation on intellectual property rights, said Chinese Vice Commerce minister Wang Chao.

They also agreed on government procurement and fair treatment to Chinese business which invest in the United States.

China will submit a new government procurement bid to the World Trade Organization (WTO) in 2014, an effort to join the WTO agreement on government procurement, said Wang.

During the JCCT, the two sides agreed to encourage the civil high-tech U.S. exports to China, covering the areas of aerospace, information technology as well as oil and gas exploration, he said.

The U.S. high-tech export control is the main cause of trade imbalance between China and the U.S., said Wang, adding that China’s imports of high-tech products from the U.S. continue to shrink in recent years.

U.S. high-tech exports to China have fallen from 18 percent to 7 percent of China’s total high-tech imports in the past decade, he said.

High-tech exports limits have long been a thorny issue in China-U.S. trade. On Thursday, Chinese Premier Li Keqiang urged the United States to relax restrictions on high-tech exports to China and provide a good environment for Chinese businesses to invest in the United States.

 

 


 

 

China, U.S. are rivals,

not enemies: survey

 

By Cheng Zhuo

 

A joint survey conducted by Chinese and U.S. institutions revealed that people in the two countries believe China and the United States can be rivals and partners at the same time.

Only a small number of respondents — no more than 15 percent on either side — said the two sides are enemies, according to a report in Thursday’s overseas edition of the People’s Daily, the flagship newspaper of the Communist Party of China.

Many Chinese people blamed U.S. arms sales to Taiwan as a major reason for tensions in bilateral relations.

The survey, jointly conducted by Beijing-based China Strategic Culture Promotion Association (CSCPA) and the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace in Washington, polled both the general public and “elite groups” in the two countries.

The “elite groups” included five categories: figures in political, commercial, academic, military and media circles.

Respondents in the two countries showed a low level of trust toward each other — lower than the trust they felt toward other countries. However, most said they believe China-U.S. relations remain “fine,” the newspaper report quoted Luo Yuan, a Chinese expert on international affairs and CSCPA vice president, as saying.

Both sides think the China-U.S. relationship is one of rivals and also partners, or somewhere between the two, while only a small portion of respondents said the two sides are enemies, it said.

The survey revealed that the younger generation of Americans showed more trust toward China than the older generation, but noted that the trust of the country’s entrepreneurs, a group with great weight in the countries’ bilateral ties, has declined over the past five years.

The survey explained that the decline may partly be due to Americans’ fear that market barriers set by the Chinese government will grant unfair advantages to Chinese businesses. Another reason for the decline may be pressure from Chinese enterprises’ ambitions to enter upstream industries, a more lucrative market previously dominated by Western companies.

According to the survey, the two sides did not see eye to eye on the role the two countries are playing and should play on the international stage.

Most Americans surveyed said they think the United States has taken other countries’ interests into account when deciding its foreign policy, but said the Chinese will not do so. The Chinese respondents gave an opposite opinion: China has been considerate in its foreign policy, and the United States has not.

A majority of Americans in the “elite group” said a world led by the U.S. will be more stable, while Chinese elites advocate balanced power to maintain stability.

This discrepancy, the newspaper said, may constitute a serious challenge to China-U.S. ties, especially when it comes to issues in the western Pacific, where China is rapidly increasing its presence.

According to the survey, most Chinese respondents from both “public” and “elite” categories regard the United States as a major threat to China. However, Americans believe “international financial turbulence,” “Islamic extremism” and the “nuclear programs by Iran and the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea” are more dangerous than a rising China.

The newspaper said one result that surprised many Chinese experts was that although 56 percent of the U.S. public supported a hardline policy in trade with China, the trade issue was not on the priority list of most American elites. Instead, most American business elites and veterans identified Internet attacks, allegedly from China, and intellectual property rights problems as their biggest concerns regarding China.

Meanwhile, Chinese respondents also worried that the United States, which plays a leading role in the Internet realm, might take destructive measures against China’s infrastructure if the two countries were to be involved in a conflict, the report said.

Chinese people also see U.S. arms sales to Taiwan as a major reason leading to tensions between the two countries. This blame is stronger among Chinese officials, according to the survey.

“It is important to recognize the other side’s crucial interests, because although there are still some implacable issues, the two sides may know each other’s ‘bottom line’ and respect it,” the report quoted Shi Yinhong, a Chinese international affairs expert, as saying.

The survey was carried out in China and the United States, with 1,004 adults and 305 members of “elite groups” in the United States, and 2,597 adults and 358 elite members in China polled.

 

 

 

 

 

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