This is the moment for stronger China-UK collaboration: president Xi

 

British Prime Minister David Cameron arrives in Beijing for a three-day visit to China

on December 2, 2013.   Photos by Wang Ye  

 

British Prime Minister David Cameron (left) arrives in Beijing  for a three-day

visit to China in Beijing, capital of China, on December 2, 2013.   Photo by Wang Ye  

 

Chinese Premier Li Keqiang (left) holds a welcoming ceremony for the visiting British

Prime Minister David Cameron in Beijing on December 2, 2013.   Photo by Wang Ye  

 

Chinese Premier Li Keqiang holds a welcoming ceremony for the visiting British Prime

Minister David Cameron in Beijing on December 2, 2013.   Photos by Li Tao  

 

Chinese Premier Li Keqiang holds talks with British Prime Minister David Cameron

in Beijing on December 2, 2013.   Photo by Wang Ye 

 

 

 

 

  Chinese premier

meets Britain’s Cameron

 

By Wang Huihui

 

Premier Li Keqiang held talks with British Prime Minister David Cameron in Beijing on Monday of December 2, the first meeting of the two heads of government since China’s new leaders took office in March.

“I believe your visit will play an important role in promoting political mutual trust, pragmatic cooperation, cultural exchanges and push bilateral relations to a new stage,” Li told Cameron before their talks.

Li was hopeful that Cameron’s three-day trip would yield fruitful results.

Cameron said he was pleased to be back to China, at the start of the new leadership that will be taking the country forward and following the third plenum on ambition for change in China.

Cameron is leading a large delegation to China, including six cabinet ministers and 150 representatives from business and trade. “The scale of the delegation mirrors the scale of the ambition that we have for Britain-China partnership.”

He hoped Li would visit Britain in the near future.

This is Cameron’s second China tour since he took office in May 2010,following an official visit in November 2010.

 

 

 

 

China, UK to boost

ties as Cameron

voices stance on Tibet

 

By Liao Lei

 

Chinese Premier Li Keqiang has pledged to enhance political and economic ties with the UK as the latter’s Prime Minister, David Cameron, voiced opposition against “Tibet Independence.”

“We two countries must insist on mutual respect and equal treatment, understand and take care of each other’s major concerns, properly handle sensitive issues and push for more vigor and results in the Chinese-British comprehensive strategic partnership,” Li told Cameron during their Monday talks.

Cameron, whose China tour was delayed since his last meeting with the Dalai Lama in May 2012, said Britain respects China’s sovereignty and territorial integrity, recognizes Tibet as part of China and does not support “Tibet Independence.”

Li suggested the two countries bolster trade and investment, enhance fiscal and financial cooperation, deepen high-tech cooperation, strengthen people-to-people and cultural exchanges, and consolidate communication and cooperation on international and regional issues.

He highlighted China’s advantage in nuclear energy and high-speed railway, encouraging China and Britain to tap market potential in the third country.

He urged Britain to stick to its anti-protectionism stance, insist on market transparency and openness, maintain the stability and constance of its investment policy, treat Chinese capital, technology and equipment equally and protect the interests of Chinese investors.

“China supports the development of the RMB offshore market in London in accordance with the market-driven principle,” Li said, urging Britain to support Chinese wholesale banks to open branches there and facilitate the listing and funding of Chinese companies.

He suggested the two sides to expand high-tech trade, enhance research and development cooperation in spaceflight, offshore wind farm and new energy.

He called on Britain to ease visa procedure for Chinese tourists and business visitors.

Li also appealed the two permanent members of the United Nations Security Council to enhance cooperation within the UN and the Group of 20 so as to preserve the multilateral trade system and cope with global challenges.

“As a major country within the European Union, Britain plays a unique and important role in China-EU relations,” Li said during their talks at the Great Hall of the People in downtown Beijing.

He appealed to Britain to further its positive role and contribute to China-EU relations and cooperation.

Cameron welcomed Chinese companies and financial institutes, pledged to enhance cooperation with China in trade, investment and science, as well as coordination on international and regional issues.

He also vowed to promote EU-China relations, including talks for a EU-China free trade treaty.

Cameron arrived in Beijing early Monday morning for a three-day visit to China.

 

 

 

Chinese Premier Li Keqiang (right) and British Prime Minister David Cameron attend a

signing ceremony of a series of cooperation agreements after their talks in Beijing

on  December 2, 2013.   Photo by Wang Ye 

 

Chinese Premier Li Keqiang and British Prime Minister David Cameron attend a signing

ceremony of a series of cooperation agreements after their talks in Beijing on December 2,

2013.   Photo by Wang Ye 

 

Chinese Premier Li Keqiang and British Prime Minister David Cameron meet with British

business delegation in Beijing on December 2, 2013.   Photo by Wang Ye 

 

Chinese Premier Li Keqiang and British Prime Minister David Cameron pose for a group

photo with British business delegation in Beijing on December 2, 2013.   Photo by Wang Ye 

 

 

 

 

Looking beyond differences for

practical China-Britain cooperation

 

By Shang Jun

 

British Prime Minister David Cameron, accompanied by a 100-strong business delegation, kicked off a high-profile visit to China on Monday.

The delayed visit is a chance that can’t be missed to bring China-Britain relations back on the right track.

Ties between Beijing and London cooled after Cameron persisted in meeting the Dalai Lama in May 2012, a move that interfered with China’s internal affairs.

For the smooth development of bilateral ties, a key lesson worth learning from that unhappy chapter is that the two countries should respect each other’s core interests and handle their differences in a proper and acceptable way.

It has to be noted there is no fundamental conflicting interests between China and Britain, while it is not unusual for the two countries to hold different views on certain issues due to their divergence in culture and social systems.

When differences emerge, communication is better than confrontation, and engaging is more effective than enraging.

A sound political relationship is the basis for the ever-expanding economic ties between China and Britain. By looking beyond their differences, the two countries can see a bigger picture.

With Beijing undertaking an ambitious reform plan to transform the world’s second largest economy and London exploring ways to escape its economic downturn, it is a good time for them to enhance practical cooperation for mutual benefit.

There is huge potential for economic cooperation between China and Britain, especially in the fields of financial services, nuclear energy and aviation.

As permanent members of the UN Security Council, China and Britain both played an important role in international affairs and can contribute more to world peace and stability by enhancing coordination.

Cameron’s China trip follows a recent visit paid by his Chinese counterpart Li Keqiang to Romania, where the Chinese premier also attended a summit with a group of leaders from Central and Eastern European countries.

It was Li’s second tour to the European continent after he took office in March. In May, Li visited Germany and Switzerland on his maiden overseas trip as Chinese premier, which demonstrates the importance Beijing attaches to its ties with Europe.

As an important member of the European Union (EU), Britain can play a crucial role in promoting ties between China and the 28-nation bloc.

The visit will have Cameron and the new Chinese leadership meet for the first time. Compared with the frequent visits between Beijing and the European continent, Britain is lagging behind.

Cameron may be late but he is still in time. 

 

 

 

Chinese Premier Li Keqiang (right) and British Prime Minister David Cameron attend

a press conference in Beijing on December 2, 2013.   Photo by Wang Ye 

 

 

 

 

China, Britain to enhance

high-tech, economic ties

 

By Liao Lei, Tan Jingjing, Hou Lijun, Yang Yijun and Wang Huihui

 

China and Britain have agreed to enhance cooperation in areas including high-speed railway, nuclear power and finance, Chinese Premier Li Keqiang said on Monday of December 2.

Li told a joint press briefing with visiting British Prime Minister David Cameron that both sides agreed to promote each other’s companies to seek breakthroughs in high-speed railway and nuclear power cooperation.

China is willing to have joint shares and even hold controlling interests in British nuclear power projects, Li said.

Bilateral cooperation in this area will also promote the opening of the third-party market and improve current and long-term employment prospects, according to the premier.

Concerning the financial sector, the two sides discussed conducting offshore RMB business in London and Chinese banks’ opening of branches in Britain.

They agreed to expand bilateral high-tech trade and support cooperation in aerospace, offshore wind power and other new energy development, Li said.

He added that Britain has agreed to take measures as soon as possible to increase high-tech exports to China, while both sides will jointly establish an innovation and research fund of 200 million pounds.

More bilateral cooperation in traditional and new media is also on the cards to promote mutual understanding, according to Li.

On people-to-people exchanges, Britain will simplify visa procedures for Chinese tourists and business travelers and increase the frequency of flights, the premier was told.

Britain is willing to streamline processes for Chinese citizens to carry out business activities and tourism in Britain, hoping that this will bring more job opportunities to the country, Cameron said.

Invited by Li, Cameron arrived in Beijing on Monday morning for a three-day official visit to China.

The meeting between Li and Cameron is the first since the new Chinese administration took office early this year and is held against the backdrop of the upcoming 10th anniversary of the China-UK comprehensive strategic partnership.

China and Britain have become indispensable partners in each other’s economic and social development, Li said at the press briefing, noting that Britain is the largest recipient of Chinese investment and students in the EU while China is Britain’s second trading partner outside the EU.

On political realtions, Li said both sides agreed that China and Britain should adhere to mutual respect and equality, take care of each other’s major interests and concerns and enhance political mutual trust.

The British side reaffirmed its respect for China’s sovereignty and territorial integrity, adherence to the one-China policy and respect for China’s core interests and major concerns, according to Li.

Li said as major world economies, China and Britain are both major forces in the international community, with bilateral relations having an important global impact.

The two leaders agreed that, in current circumstances, the two should continue to oppose trade protectionism and promote trade and investment liberalization.

The two sides should enhance cooperation on an international level and work together to promote nuclear non-proliferation and seek peaceful resolution for major international and regional issues.

Both sides should also promote exchanges between countries of different systems and civilizations, he said.

Both sides also inked agreements on investment, finance, legal affairs, culture and health cooperation. 

 

 

 

Chinese Vice Premier Wang Yang and British Prime Minister David Cameron walk into

the venue of the 2013 UK-China Business Summit in Beijing on December 2, 2013.

Photo by Liu Weibing 

 

 

 

Chinese vice premier calls for

closer China-UK economic ties

 

By Bai Jie

 

Chinese Vice Premier Wang Yang on Monday called on China and Britain to deepen economic cooperation in the hope of becoming long-term complementary and win-win partners.

In his address at the UK-China Business Summit attended by visiting UK Prime Minister David Cameron, Wang noted that the United Kingdom was the first developed country to have achieved industrialization, while China is the largest developing country.

China and the UK are highly complementary in their economies, and can surely become long-term partners for win-win cooperation, Wang said.

He encouraged the two countries to make full use of each other’s comparative advantages, expand the scale and explore new areas of economic and trade cooperation so as to reach a trade volume of 100 billion U.S. dollars in 2015.

The vice premier reiterated China’s firm adherence to its opening-up policy, confirming that China will expand areas of opening up and shorten the process for examining and approving foreign investment and investment in foreign countries.

He said China will make its foreign investment policy stable, transparent and foreseeable, so as to enhance the confidence of foreign companies investing in China.

Cameron, who led a large delegation to China, including six cabinet ministers and 150 representatives from business and trade, said in his address that the two economies are “truly complementary” and the cooperation opportunities are “all the greater.”

Britain welcomes China’s investment, said Cameron, adding that his country is committed to boosting free trade and investment.

Prior to the summit, Wang met with Cameron.

Cameron arrived in Beijing earlier Monday for a three-day official visit to China at the invitation of Chinese Premier Li Keqiang.

This is Cameron’s second China tour since he took office in May 2010,following an official visit in November 2010. 

 

 

 

Chinese President Xi Jinping (right) shakes hands with visiting British Prime Minister David

Cameron during their meeting in Beijing on December 2, 2013.   Photo by Ju Peng 

 

 

 

 

This is the moment for

stronger China-UK

collaboration: president Xi

 

By Xiong Zhengyan

 

Chinese President Xi Jinping on Monday said now is the right time for China and the United Kingdom to seek stronger cooperation.

“We are transforming the mode of economic development, restructuring the economy and encouraging companies to go abroad quickly, while the UK is boosting reform and welcomes foreign investment. This is the moment for stronger cooperation,” Xi told visiting British Prime Minister David Cameron.

Xi briefed Cameron on the decision on deepening reforms approved at the third Plenary Session of the 18th Communist Party of China (CPC) Central Committee earlier in November.

The economies of China and the UK complement each other, have a solid foundation and enjoy a broad future, Xi said.

“We expect the UK to be more active and open in its collaboration with China and to create a more accommodating environment,” Xi said, calling for the two countries to share experience on reform and innovation.

Stressing that the two countries are major economies and permanent members of the United Nations Security Council, Xi said China-UK relations not only impact the two countries, but also have global significance.

Xi called on the two countries to go beyond the differences in their national conditions, systems and values to deepen understanding, respect each other,take care of each other’s major concerns and core interests, enhance mutual trust, map the future of bilateral relations and boost long-term bilateral cooperation.

Xi said the world economy is at a critical juncture of recovery and the world structure is undergoing profound changes.

Xi called for the two countries to step up cooperation on international issues and jointly deal with global challenges.

Cameron said China’s development is epoch-making, benefits the Chinese and offers important opportunities to the world.

Cameron said the recent CPC Plenum has provided a blueprint for China’s future and is impressive, adding that he is convinced that China will accomplish its goals.

Cameron said that the UK places great importance on China’s success and developing ties with China, and would like to maintain high-level interactions with China and deepen understanding of China.

He said the UK welcomes Chinese investment in infrastructure and nuclear power.

Cameron reaffirmed the UK’s commitment to communicating and coordinating with China on international and regional issues, safeguarding world peace and security, and promoting the stable recovery and sustainable development of the world economy.

Earlier on Monday, Chinese Premier Li Keqiang held talks with Cameron and agreed on bilateral cooperation in a number of areas, such as high-speed rail, nuclear power, finance and aerospace.

 

 

 

Chinese Premier Li Keqiang (left) and British Prime Minister David Cameron visit the

National Museum of China in Beijing on December 2, 2013.   Photo by Liu Jiansheng 

 

Chinese Premier Li Keqiang and British Prime Minister David Cameron visit the National

Museum of China in Beijing on December 2, 2013.   Photo by Liu Jiansheng 

 

Chinese Premier Li Keqiang and British Prime Minister David Cameron pose for a group

photo during their visit to the National Museum of China in Beijing on December 2, 2013.

Photo by Zhang Duo 

 

 

PROFILE

 

British Prime Minister David Cameron 

 

By Huangyi Jiazi

 

British Prime Minister David Cameron arrived in Beijing on Monday of December 2 for a three-day official visit to China at the invitation of his Chinese counterpart Li Keqiang.

The following is a profile of the British leader.

Cameron was born on October 9, 1966 in London. He studied at the elite Eton College before attending Oxford University, where he majored in philosophy, politics and economics and graduated with first class honors.

He worked for the Conservative Research Department between 1988 and 1993, which included a stint briefing former Prime Minister John Major for Prime Minister’s Questions in parliament, and later served as special adviser to the chancellor of the exchequer and the home secretary.

Following his role as special advisor, in 1994, Cameron became the director of corporate affairs at media company Carlton Communications. He left in February 2001, going on to be elected as a member of parliament (MP) for the Oxfordshire constituency of Witney the same year.

On December5 when he was 39 years old, he was elected as Conservative leader.

He became the British prime minister in May, 2010, leading a coalition government with the Liberal Democrats.

 

 

 

Zhang Dejiang (right), chairman of China’s National People’s Congress (NPC) Standing

Committee, shakes hands with visiting British Prime Minister David Cameron during

their meeting in Beijing, on December 2, 2013.   Photo by Li Tao 

 

Zhang Dejiang (right), chairman of China’s National People’s Congress (NPC) Standing

Committee, meets with visiting British Prime Minister David Cameron in Beijing,

on  December 2, 2013.   Photo by Li Tao 

 

 

 

 

Top Chinese legislator

meets with British PM

 

By Bai Jie

 

Top Chinese legislator Zhang Dejiang met with British Prime Minister David Cameron on Monday.

Zhang, chairman of the National People’s Congress (NPC) Standing Committee, said the NPC and the British parliament have maintained a good relationship for years and have established a regular exchange mechanism.

He called on both sides to work together to exchange experiences on legislation and governance, enhance political mutual trust and respect each other’s concerns.

Cameron said Britain attaches great importance to parliamentary exchanges.

Stressing that China’s success is in the world’s interest, he said Britain would like to enhance dialogue and communication with China in various areas so as to promote substantial cooperation.

Cameron arrived in Beijing on Monday morning for a three-day official visit to China at the invitation of Chinese Premier Li Keqiang.

This is Cameron’s second China tour since he took office in May 2010,following an official visit in November 2010.

 

 

 

Chinese Vice Premier Liu Yandong (right) meets with British Health Secretary Jeremy Hunt,

who is also the British president of the high-level mechanism on cultural exchanges and

dialogue between China and Britain, in Beijing, on December 2, 2013.   Photo by Wang Ye

 

 

 

 

 

Chinese vice premier meets

British health secretary

 

By Liu Dongkai

Chinese Vice Premier Liu Yandong met in Beijing on Monday afternoon with British Secretary of State for Health Jeremy Hunt.

Liu spoke highly of the rich achievements made under the China-Britain mechanism for high-level cultural exchanges, which she and Hunt jointly launched in London in April, 2012.

She said that under the mechanism the two countries have conducted activities in the areas of education, science, technology, culture, sports and youth.

Liu expressed the wish that the two sides would continue to enhance the mechanism by expanding its scale and enriching the content of cultural exchanges.

Hunt is a member of the delegation accompanying British Prime Minister David Cameron during his visit to Beijing.

 

 

 

 

 

RMB clearing services

to debut in UK

 

By Zhan Yan and Lü Dong

 

Agricultural Bank of China (ABC) and Standard Chartered Bank will offer renminbi (RMB) clearing services in the United Kingdom (UK), the first banks to do so.

The ABC and Standard Chartered signed a memorandum of understanding (MOU) on Monday, through which financial institutions and corporates can work with Standard Chartered UK and ABC UK to execute RMB transactions.

Clearing of RMB transactions in the UK is currently done through a very robust real time gross settlement system in Hong Kong through clearing banks in Taiwan and Singapore or through agent banks in China.

The RMB clearing services in the UK is expected to strengthen London’s position as a leading offshore RMB center.

“London’s position as a leading international financial center is enhanced by the ability to offer onshore clearing services that allow ‘on-demand’ access to settle RMB denominated services within the London time zone,” said Peter Sands, Group CEO of Standard Chartered, in a statement.

The signing of this strategic cooperation agreement is another major move to foster “a stronger partnership in which we will jointly build the London offshore RMB center and promote the cross-border use of RMB,” said ABC president Zhang Yun.

China allows foreign institutional buyers to trade yuan-denominated financial products through a regime called RQFII, or RMB Qualified Foreign Institutional Investor, with a global quota of 350 billion yuan (57.10 billion U.S. dollars).

China’s central bank in June signed an agreement to establish a currency swap line with the Bank of England.

Import and export RMB financing totaled 33.6 billion yuan in 2012, up 100 percent from 2011, and the volume of letters of credit and other loan guarantees grew 13 times to 4.7 billion yuan, according to a report released by the City of London in June.

In July 2010, Standard Chartered became the largest banking investor in ABC’s H-share IPO and subscribed to 500 million U.S. dollars worth of H-shares.

 

 

 

 

 

NEW POST   updated on December 3, 2013

 

Mightier yuan brightens

prospects of bank’s business

 

By Huang Yan and Lü Dong

 

The growing stature of the Chinese yuan in global trade and finance has brought exciting opportunities in yuan-related business, said Standard Chartered Group CEO Peter Sands in Beijing on Tuesday of December 3.

Renminbi (RMB), the Chinese currency, is now among the most actively traded currency in the world as the Chinese government moves to make it easier for the yuan to flow across its borders.

“We are very excited at the prospects of renminbi becoming even more integrated into the global economy,” said Sands, who is here accompanying British Prime Minister David Cameron on his second visit to China since taking office.

Sands added that the process of promoting the yuan’s use beyond Chinese borders, though with many steps to go, has been “extraordinarily rapid.”

Trading of the yuan in global foreign exchange markets has more than tripled from three years ago after China allowed the currency to be traded in offshore markets.

Latest figures from global payment services company SWIFT placed the yuan as the second-most used currency in trade finance in October.

“In the beginning of 2010, less than 0.4 percent of China’s trade was denominated in renminbi, and now in the first half of this year, it’s 14.7 percent,” said Sands, calling the increased use of renminbi an “incredibly rapid change.”

So far the currency is partially convertible under the capital account, but authorities in China have stepped up their commitment to make it fully convertible in a carefully managed process to prevent systemic risk to the country’s sheltered financial market.

Standard Chartered announced on Monday a renewed cooperation with the Agricultural Bank of China (ABC) to be the first two banks to offer renminbi clearing services in London, as the world’s leading financial hub competes against Hong Kong, Singapore and Taiwan to become a key outpost for offshore yuan trade.

According to Sands, it is “logical” for London to become a major offshore yuan center given the city’s status as the world’s largest foreign exchange market and home to a string of multinational firms’ treasury centers.

The emergence of multiple offshore yuan hubs has also brought opportunities to banks like Standard Chartered and HSBC as they help Chinese companies issue yuan-denominated bonds overseas.

The Asia-focused bank also hopes to tap ABC’s extensive network in China and strong client base in small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs).

China has pledged reforms of its banking sector to make lenders more attentive to the financing needs of cash-strapped but nimble small businesses.

Such reforms will be coupled with more market-based interest rates, which will be painful for many Chinese banks as cheaper financing costs and higher returns on deposits hurt their profits.

Yet such moves will allow SMEs to compete for financing against state-backed firms on a more equal footing and in the long term, enable efficient allocation of capital.

Banks with a strong SME client base may end up as the winner of such reforms and Standard Chartered wants to be one of them.

The organization prides itself as “the first foreign bank to set up a dedicated SME banking business,” with 700 members of staff across 25 Chinese cities.

Sands said the bank will deepen its engagement with Chinese SMEs, calling such banking services “a crucial part of our China strategy.”

Standard Chartered grossed most of its profits from emerging countries in Asia, Africa and the Middle East while Sands said it has expertise and experiences in SME banking services across many different countries.

“SMEs for most countries in the world are the biggest source of job creation, so ensuring they get effective financing is incredibly important to China’s sustained economic progress,” he said.

 

 

 

 

 

 NEW POST   updated on December 3, 2013

 

Visiting Shanghai

 

British Prime Minister David Cameron visits the Bund area in east China’s Shanghai

on December 3, 2013.   Photo by Chen Fei

 

British Prime Minister David Cameron views the TX4 taxicab produced by China’s

Geely Group during his visit in east China’s Shanghai on  December 3, 2013.  

Photo by Chen Fei

 

British Prime Minister David Cameron delivers a speech at the Shanghai Jiao

Tong University during his visit in east China’s Shanghai, on December 3, 2013.  

Photo by Chen Fei

 

British Prime Minister David Cameron attends the signing ceremony of a memorandum

of understanding between the UK Trade & Investment and the Alibaba Group during

his visit in east China’s Shanghai on Decembr 3, 2013.   Photo by Chen Fei

 

 

 

 

 

NEW POST   updated on December 4, 2013 

 

Visiting Chengdu 

 

British Prime Minister David Cameron visits the Thatched Cottage of Du Fu in Chengdu,

capital of southwest China’s Sichuan Province, on December 4, 2013. Du Fu was a famous

Chinese poet in Tang Dynasty (618-907 A.D.)   Photo by Xue Yubin

 

British Prime Minister David Cameron enjoys Chinese tea at the Thatched Cottage of

Du Fu in Chengdu on December 4, 2013.    Photo by Xue Yubin

 

British Prime Minister David Cameron communicates with children at Longjiang Road

Primary School in Chengdu on December 4, 2013.   Photo by Xue Yubin

 

British Prime Minister David Cameron plays table tennis with children at Longjiang Road

Primary School in Chengdu on December 4, 2013.    Photo by Xue Yubin

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

British PM’s Weibo account |  http://weibo.com/ukprimeminister

 

 

 

 

British PM’s Weibo account

draws funny feedback

 

By Liu Lu and Tao Yiping

 

Chinese netizens have started “following” British Prime Minister David Cameron after he opened a microblog account on China’s leading social network.

Cameron, who arrived in Beijing on Monday of December 2 for a three-day visit, first wrote on the Twitter-like Sina Weibo on November 29. The post read, “Hello my friends in China. I’m pleased to have joined Weibo and look forward to visiting China very soon.” The post also had a Chinese translation.

Chinese online users responded with “Welcome to China” and “Hello Cameron.”

As of 4:30 p.m. on Wednesday of December 4, his account “Yingguoshouxiang” or “British Prime Minister” has posted eight entries and attracted 258,640 followers.

Entries in Chinese read, “I have learnt about how Jaguar and Land Rover achieved great success in the Chinese market” and “I have witnessed their signing of contracts with China.”

Also in Chinese, Cameron’s post read, “Thanks for your attention. I am very glad to be visiting China again and eager to know what you think. Leave your questions here and I will answer some when I conclude the visit.”

Netizens asked various questions, some ridiculous and funny.

“FalcoNi_MJ” wrote, “Hi David, could you kindly ask the TV crew to accelerate the shooting of Sherlock, we deadly miss the curly Sher.”

“Also, do you see Beijing defeating London and getting the title City of Fog? Thank you,” “FalcoNi_MJ” added.

Other comments included, “Please let Manchester United sell Rooney quickly,” “Prime minister, can you simplify the visa procedure?” and “I really want to visit Downtown Abbey.”

Some netizens even asked the prime minister for his opinion on diver Tom Daley dating a man.

This is Cameron’s second visit to China since he took office in May 2010. He first visited in November 2010.

A delegation led by Cameron includes six cabinet ministers and 150 representatives from business and trade.

During Chinese Premier Li Keqiang’s talks with Cameron, both sides agreed on cooperation in a number of areas, such as high-speed rail, nuclear power, finance and aerospace.

Li suggested the two countries bolster trade and investment, enhance fiscal and financial cooperation, deepen high-tech collaboration, strengthen people-to-people and cultural exchanges, and consolidate communication and cooperation on international and regional issues.

Cameron said the UK places great importance on developing ties with China, and would like to maintain high-level interactions.

Cameron also reaffirmed the UK’s commitment to communicating and coordinating with China on international and regional issues, safeguarding world peace and security, and promoting the stable recovery and sustainable development of the world economy.

 

 

 

 

 

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